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How many ways can fire and meat be made into something amazing? You’d be surprised.
We went on a bulgogi tour through two Korean cities known for making the best of the
best bulgogi, and what we discovered was just how versatile this Korean favorite really is.

 
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The story of bulgogi.

You may not know it by looking at it, but bulgogi, literally meaning “fire meat”
(불고기), is a dish containing the history of Korea.

 
read more

Explore the cities where our bulgogi was born.

Ulsan

Korea's seventh-largest city. Home to eonyang bulgogi, often considered the most premium variety of bulgogi.

Daegu

Known for Bukseongro, a golmok, or a street that offers a variety of restaurants and vendors all specializing in the same food. On Bukseongro, that specialty is bulgogi.

Ulsan

Korea’s seventh-largest city. Home to eonyang bulgogi, often
considered the most premium variety of bulgogi.

The essence of bulgogi.

The fire.

Grill, roast, sear, or char – the method of adding fire to bulgogi isn’t set in stone, but it is vital. After all, bulgogi literally translates to “fire meat.”

The meat.

Traditionally bulgogi is made with pork or beef. The cut of each meat varies, though rib-eye and sirloin are the most common beef varieties.

The sauce.

The traditional Korean-style bulgogi marinade is made with Asian pear, scallions, garlic, soy, and roasted sesame oil, but the variations are nearly endless. Everyone has their own secret recipe.

The onions.

Sliced and grilled onions add sweetness to balance out the intense savory qualities of the meat. Combine onions with a tender piece of fire-cooked meat, and you've got the perfect bite.

The flair.

This one’s optional, though every chef in Korea seems to add their own extra something – whether it’s sauce, cooking style, or presentation – that they consider to be uniquely theirs, and undoubtedly the best. Once you’ve tasted a few variations, it’s hard to disagree with them.

The fire.

Grill, roast, sear, or char – the method of adding fire to bulgogi isn’t set in stone, but it is vital. After all, bulgogi literally translates to “fire meat.”

The meat.

Traditionally bulgogi is made with pork or beef. The cut of each meat varies, though rib-eye and sirloin are the most common beef varieties.

The sauce.

The traditional Korean-style bulgogi marinade is made with Asian pear, scallions, garlic, soy, and roasted sesame oil, but the variations are nearly endless. Everyone has their own secret recipe.

The onions.

Sliced and grilled onions add sweetness to balance out the intense savory qualities of the meat. Combine onions with a tender piece of fire-cooked meat, and you've got the perfect bite.

The flair.

This one’s optional, though every chef in Korea seems to add their own extra something – whether it’s sauce, cooking style, or presentation – that they consider to be uniquely theirs, and undoubtedly the best. Once you’ve tasted a few variations, it’s hard to disagree with them.

bulgogi

Our Korean Bulgogi Steak.

잘먹겠습니다
“I will eat well”

In Korea, this saying is shared before a meal. It conveys appreciation for what you have been served and tells the host you will enjoy your dish. We practiced this phrase many times during recent travels through Korea – which is also where we fell in love with bulgogi. Now we're bringing that love to your table.

Introducing P.F. Chang’s new Korean Bulgogi Steak: Premium New York Strip, bulgogi sauce, Yukon potatoes, and crispy fried onion straws

Trust us; you will eat well.


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Bulgogi Blog Post 

The story of bulgogi.

A dish containing the history of Korea.


read more